Ah, the mixed messages.

9 March 2011

One would love to see her saying something more realistic, like “Here’s my passport to putting food on my table and a roof over my head.” But as it turns out, even the classic Rosie the Riveter poster was more ambivalent than we’d like to believe, as I read recently at Sociological Images. Damn scholars, always putting a damper on our views of the past.

Another long flight for me today, for which I’ll be accompanied by Children of Heaven, as recommended by Smintheus from Unbossed.

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3 Responses to “Ah, the mixed messages.”

  1. JE Says:

    This is a fascinating set of color photographs from the late 30s and the 40s.

    http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/26/captured-america-in-color-from-1939-1943/2363/

    Photo 66 has a real riveter. (And actually I just noticed that pic is also on the Wikipedia page for “Rosie the Riveter”–so it might be well-known. But I’d never seen it.)

    #54 has a group of railroad workers.

    Other curious pictures:

    #20. The number of barefoot children (who otherwise seem to be wearing their best school clothes) in what seems to be a special school performance.

    #17. What are they eating? I can see biscuits, some kind of vegetable (it looks overcooked). The large jars must have some kind of pickles or preserves. Small plate of something next to the wall. The large jar of white stuff–sugar? Then there’s the can of Karo syrup (possible the can is being reused to store something else–or is it just a big can of Karo). I bet my grandmother would have been able to tell us a lot about that meal.


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